On the Road to Santander: An Endless Song

Sali de mi casa un dia camino de Santander y en camino encontre un papel que asi decia, “Sali de mi casa un dia camino de Santander y en camino encontre un papel que asi decia, ‘Sali de mi casa un dia camino de Santander y en camino encontre un papel que asi decia . . . ‘”

Translated: One day, I left home for the road to Santander, and on the road I came across a paper that said, “One day, I left home for the road to Santander, and on the road I came across a paper that said, ‘One day, I left home for the road to Santander, and on the road I came across a paper that said . . . ‘”

(Kids’ song from Spain. Thanks Omar Rodriguez Rodriguez!)

Metamusic

A few self-referential songs:

The Music Goes Round and Round

The Music Goes Round and Round,” sung by Betty Boop, aka Helen Kane. Originally featured in the film “The Music Goes Round” (1936), played by Riley-Farley & the Onyx Club Boys. (I am more familiar with Louis Prima’s version of the song, but couldn’t find a copy to share with you.)

The lyrics give you simple instructions on how to play a trumpet:

I blow through here
The music goes ’round and around
Whoa-ho-ho-ho-ho
And it comes out here.
I push the first valve down
The music goes down and around
Whoa-ho-ho-ho-ho
And it comes out here.

The following verses describe pushing “the middle valve down” and then “the other valve.” And just like that you can play the trumpet!

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The Lack of Blank Spaces: Cage’s 4’33” and Rauschenberg’s “White Paintings”

Well, that didn’t work. I intended to leave this post blank — thirty empty lines followed by the “more” function (“Read the rest of the entry”), then two hundred and sixty three blank lines, another “more,” and one hundred sixty lines, each line representing a second of silence in John Cage’s famous song  “4’33,” three movements of no music totaling four minutes and thirty three seconds, composed for any instrument or combination of instruments. However, WordPress will not allow any blank lines. Although cyberspace is relatively cheap and there is an apparently limitless supply of it, the program edits out the empty spaces. On WordPress, I can write anything I want, except nothing. So, I will have to break the silence Cage created.

Continue reading “The Lack of Blank Spaces: Cage’s 4’33” and Rauschenberg’s “White Paintings””