Syllabus for English 93: Developmental Composition Class

The Power of Word

Objective: To gain the power of word, the enormous advantage in education, career and daily life that comes from the ability to read and write effectively.
Required Texts

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. “They Say / I Say”: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. 2nd ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2009.

Davis, Sampson, George Jenkins, Rameck Hunt, and Lisa Frazier-Page. The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream. New York City: Riverhead Trade, 2003.

(Recommended) Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers, eds. Rules for Writers with Writing about Literature. City College of San Francisco Edition. 7th ed. Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s, 2013.

Course Description

Course description: English 93 focuses on training and practice in academic essay writing and analytical reading. Emphasis is on learning to read and write pre-collegiate, argumentative essays.

Student learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

A. Demonstrate the ability to write and revise in- and out-of-class essays relying on text-based and argumentative strategies that show competence with essay structure.

B. Show ability to comprehend shorter critical essays and articles as well as longer, more sustained non-fiction works (Advanced Degrees of Reading Power readability score of 58 or above).

C. Recognize and show, through discussion and writing, that argumentation requires a logical framework and credible evidence.

D. Summarize and demonstrate comprehension of increasingly longer and more complex texts, both verbally and in writing.

E. Identify and use key structural elements of an essay or longer work, including the thesis, topic sentences, and supporting details.

F. Distinguish between and accurately interpret major textual inferences and implied information.

G. Demonstrate the ability to consistently write complete sentences of some syntactic complexity, including coordination and subordination.

H. Demonstrate control, a majority of the time, over the conventions of Standard Written English.

I. Demonstrate an ability to recognize grammatical patterns of error and revise accordingly.

J. Demonstrate an ability to integrate sources as evidence and use parenthetical citations.

Course Description

We will have three major units this semester. The first is “Staying in College,” in which we will discuss the reasons students drop out and strategies for succeeding in college. The second is “Finding Your ‘Hidden Intellectualism.” Gerald Graff, one of the writers of “They Say / I Say” claims that many people use academic skills in non-academic pursuits, such as sports, which we can tap into and draw into the academic environment. The third unit is “Issues of Language and Identity,” in which we will explore the power relationships of language and identity, looking for a more open and inclusive view of the many different ways of speaking and writing that we all use as we develop control over Standard English.

Our course will also interweave three major threads: reading and critical thinking, essay structure, and the grammar of the sentence. With reading and critical thinking, we will learn how to underline and annotate texts, how to put our ideas in conversation with those of others, how to recognize that the authors we read are also responding to the views of others, how to analyze assumptions and implications in the writings we read, and how to evaluate the arguments and support of the writers we read. For essay structure, we will practice the unified thesis statement, introductions, topic sentences, support, concluding sentences, and conclusions. Regarding grammar, we will work on choosing the right word, controlling connotation, improving sentence focus, selecting active verbs, making sure the core of the sentence is logical, combining independent and dependent clauses with connecting words, mastering sentence boundaries, improving parallelism, and adding detail to nouns with adjective clauses and phrases.

Grading

Gaming system: Rather than giving letter grades (which often feel like a punishment if the grade is less than an A), I will be awarding points, much as in a scoring system of a game. Almost every score adds to a student’s total, so students should feel that they are constantly moving forward. Only a few things, such as turning in writing assignments late, using electronic devices for non-educational purposes, and not bringing in underlined and annotated reading materials, will result in penalties. As in gaming, higher numbers are more psychologically satisfying, so I will be awarding points by the hundreds. One hundred points is equivalent to 1% of the final grade. 1,000 points is 10%, or one full grade level (raising a grade from C to B, for example). 10,000 points is a perfect score for the course of 100%.

Points breakdown:

Participation 1100 points
Reading forums, exercises, and quizzes 600 points
English labs 400 points
Presentation 100 points
1st paper: Beginning of semester in-class essay 0 points
2nd paper: “Staying in College” 1250 points
Reflection paper 100 points
Quality of required revision 500 points
3rd paper: Midterm in-class essay 1000 points
4th paper: “Finding Your ‘Hidden Intellectualism’” 1500 points
Reflection paper 100 points
5th paper: “Issues of Language and Identity” 1750 points
Reflection paper 100 points
6th paper: Authentic task: Letter or review 500 points
7th paper: Final in-class essay 1000 points

Translation of points to grades:

9000 points or higher is an A
8000-8999 points is a B
7000-7999 is a C
(Anything less than 7000 is not enough to pass the class.)
6000-6999 is a D
0-5999 is an F

Important notes: Students must do the readings and submit all in-class and out-of-class essays, including the required revision of the second paper, in order to pass the class. Some extra credit activities will come up throughout the semester, but students should not rely on them for the final grade. Extra credit is limited to 500 points. I will send out progress reports each month, but students may also visit me in office hours or send me an email to see how they are doing.

Participation (1100 points)

Regular attendance and meaningful participation in class and online are essential. Each class attended on time will count for 25 points. If students arrive late, they will only get 15 points. Respect for others, regardless of race, class, religion, gender, sexual orientation and physical ability is required.

Reading Forums, Exercises, and Quizzes (500 points)

Homework: All exercises, readings, and writing assignments listed to the right of a class on the syllabus must be completed after that class and before the next. Students must bring a copy of all readings, underlined and annotated, in order to refer to the text during discussions. Those who do not bring a marked copy will lose 25 points for each reading. (Electronic copies are acceptable if students can underline and annotate.)

Reading forums (possible 25 points each): Whenever we have a reading assignment, students must post one detailed, thoughtful question about the reading and respond to at least two other students’ questions. Questions are due by midnight the day before we are going to discuss the text (to give me and classmates time to read the questions before class). After that time, questions may count toward participation score but will not add to reading forum score. Comments may be posted until class time for full credit. Further participation on the discussion boards is encouraged and will improve the participation score.

Students should read the questions others have posted before adding their questions to make sure they are not repeating. Since this is part of the generative phase of writing — the phase when students are producing ideas — grammar, spelling and punctuation will not be scored, although they should make an effort to produce clean, understandable writing. At the beginning of the semester, I will base scores on simple completion. Soon I will be adding requirements, such as detail, framed quotes, summaries, and citations. Unfortunately, we may not always be able to discuss every question during class, but even an unanswered question will help students engage with the text, generate ideas, practice writing in a low-stakes environment, and develop discussion skills.

Quizzes: We will have two surprise quizzes on the reading material to make sure students are completing the reading, but if I suspect that many students are not completing the reading assignments, I will make the quizzes more frequent. Toward the end of the semester, we will also have a quiz on “They Say / I Say” and the grammar of the sentence to review the course material.

Presentation (100 points)

At some point throughout the semester each student will do a brief 10-15 minute presentation on one of the required readings. Students will present a brief biography of the author, give historical context to the piece to help readers understand why the author wrote it, a brief summary of the reading, an overview of the main points, personal reaction and opinion, then questions and discussion, partially based on reading forum questions.

Lab Requirement (400 points)

According to City College core requirements, students must complete 16 hours of English lab for the semester. Each completed lab will be worth 25 points. Also, ten more labs may be done for further extra credit for a maximum of 250 points. Lab reports will be turned in with major writing assignments. The labs should fulfill these requirements:

1. Research the lab and its resources by Monday, January 13th. (This requirement does not involve points.) Google “CCSF English Lab” and review: Hours, Lab Guide, Web Resources, What and Where, and What You Should Do

2. Tutors: 4-6 hours. Students must visit a tutor at least once for each major out of class paper and preferably twice. If students do not visit a tutor, I will not accept the paper. Students may also visit tutors for help with reading and grammar.

3. Grammar: 4-6 hours working on grammar with Learning Curve, beginning with the grammar diagnostic program which will identify grammatical weaknesses of the students and lead them to the necessary tasks.

  • Alternatively, students may join weekly grammar groups to fulfill individual hourly requirements or attend a four week writing group, which would complete the grammar requirement.

4. Reading: 4-6 hours on Reading Plus. Reading Plus must be done on campus, but may be worked on at any computer center there.

  • Alternatively, students may join a four week reading group to complete the reading requirement.

Major Writing Assignments (7800 points)

Expectations: We will have three in-class essays. The beginning of the semester in-class essay will not be scored, but will give me an idea of each student’s strengths and weakness. The midterm and final will be worth 1000 points each, or 10% of the grade. There will be three out-of-class essays for 1500 points each, which will increase in length and complexity throughout the semester. On each assignment, I will lay out the basic requirements. If the paper does not meet these requirements, I will return it to the student. I will also list qualities that make a good paper and offer suggestions for a superior paper. All papers must be in double-spaced in 12 point font in MLA formatting, turned in with prewriting materials, worksheets, previous drafts and checklists in a folder.

Reflection papers (100 points each): With each out of class essay, students will turn in an informal reflection paper, explaining what they liked and disliked about the writing assignment, what was difficult and easy, what they learned and what they need to continue working on. These papers will be graded for ideas and examples, rather than grammar and punctuation.

Authentic writing task (500 points): Along with the out-of-class essays students will have one authentic writing tasks (writings with an real audience and purpose) connected to one of the revised essays, namely, an a letter to a politician, administrator or other official about an important social issue or an open letter to the editor. Alternately, students may write an online review of The Pact.

Revisions: I am a very, very tough grader, awarding points only for college level writing demonstrating clarity, concision, grammatical accuracy, specificity, organization, carefully-staged argumentation, support and citation. With the “Staying in College,” I will require revision, and the new score will replace the initial score. However, I will also be grading on the quality of the revision for 500 points. The revision must be substantially improved, so even an A paper may get a low score on the revision if the paper does not have major changes to argument, organization, support, wording and grammar. Students may revise the “Staying in College” paper once more to raise the paper and revision score. For the “Hidden Intellectualism” paper, students may only revise once. For the “Language and Identity” paper and the authentic task, students may not revise, as they should be learning to be independent writers.

When revising, work first on large issues like organisation, argument and support, then turn to correcting mistakes. Correction of surface errors will result in a slightly better score. For significant improvement, students must thoroughly revise wording, organization, argumentation, and support. I encourage students to meet with me to discuss revision plans. Good writing requires revision. The best writers rewrite their work many, many times. Take advantage of this opportunity to improve your writing . . . and your score!

Deadlines: If students cannot make a deadline, they must contact me before the due date and make new arrangements. For each class period that a paper is late, I will subtract 10% of the total up to 30%.

Other Policies and Resources

Electronic Devices: Although they are unnecessary, I encourage the use of electronic devices in the classroom for academic purposes in the classroom. Students should look up unfamiliar words, check facts, and add solid research to discussions. Students who catch me giving an incorrect fact will gain 25 points, and those who catch me making a spelling mistake after I have had a chance to look over my writing will get 10. However, if students use devices for other reasons (for instance, checking social networking sites), I will deduct 25 points from their class score. Three infractions will result in the loss of the privilege.

Plagiarism: The purpose of the class is to give students the skills they need to frame their own original ideas in effective prose, so plagiarism–copying someone else’s work without giving them credit (and this includes any copying and pasting from a website)–is not only stealing someone else’s hard work, but also cheating oneself out of the opportunity to gain the power of the word!

Special Accommodations:  In coordination with the DSPS office, reasonable accommodation will be provided for eligible students with disabilities. If you do not yet have an accommodation letter, please contact the DSPS office at 415-452-5481 or visit DSPS, Rosenberg Library, Room 32

Date of Class

Topics

Homework

Unit I: Staying in College

1st week: Introductions

January 10th, Friday

Introduction to the instructor and the course

Go over syllabus

Writing: “You Write the Class” questionnaire

Research: English labs and web resources

Review: Syllabus

2nd week: What is good writing?

January 13th, Monday

Continue going over syllabus

Icebreaker

Research: Find an example of good writing in any form or genre (a famous quote, a poem, song lyrics, an extract from a short story, an extract from an article, a blog post, a text message, a tweet, and so on). Print it out on a sheet of paper and bring it in to class.

Appraisal essay: “What is the Principal Benefit of Writing Well?”

January 15th, Wednesday

Reaction to questionnaires

What is good writing?: Small groups and open class

Learner training: “Edutopia: What is Your Learning Style?”, “Succeeding in Continuing and Higher Education,” and “Effective Habits for Effective Studying” (Simply google them or find them on the CCSF English Lab Web Resources page.) Either print out the final screen of each or, on a piece of paper, write down your name results.

January 17th,

Friday

English lab orientation

Insight: Log on to Insight, create a profile (if you haven’t done so already), and introduce yourself in the Introductory Forum under the first week of our class website.

Tutorial on Learning Curve

January 20th, Monday

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

No Classes!

3rd week: Reading Different Texts Differently

January 22nd, Wednesday

Icebreaker

Reading different texts differently: Short story, comic, poem, newspaper, and textbook

Reading: Underline and annotate “Introduction: Entering the Conversation” (1-14), and Ch. 1: “‘They Say’: Starting with What Others are Saying” (19-28) from “They Say / I Say.”

Post a thoughtful, detailed question on the reading forum on Insight by midnight Sunday and respond to at least two other students’ questions by class time (one of which must be about the other reading). Adding more to discussions will increase your participation score.

January 24th, Friday

Reading different texts differently, cont.

Underlining and annotations

Introduction and “Ch. 1: ‘They Say’: Starting with What Others are Saying”: Main points

Writing Assignment: “Staying in College”

Reading: Read “Why We Quit” by Yvonne Raley from Scientific American (handout), “The Dropout Dilemma: One in Four College Freshmen Drop Out” by Jonathan Whitbourne (handout) and Ch. 2: “‘Her Point Is’: The Art of Summarizing” (30-40) from “They Say / I Say.”

Don’t forget to post a thoughtful, detailed question on one of the readings by midnight Sunday and respond to at least two other students’ questions.

4th week: Obstacles to Academic Success

January 27th, Monday

Brainstorming: Obstacles to academic success and ways to overcome them

“Ch. 2: ‘Her Point Is’: The Art of Summarizing”: Main points

Presentation and Discussion on “Why We Quit” and “The Droupout Dilemma”: Ron

Brainstorming: 10-20 obstacles to success in college and 3-5 possible solutions for each.

Reading: Underline and annotate “Community Colleges are Bulging, But–” by Charlotte Allen (google it or find it on Insight), “Community College Dropout Rate Alarms Researchers” by Nanette Asimov (on sfgate.com or on Insight), and Ch. 3: “‘As He Himself Puts It’: The Art of Quoting” (42-50) from “They Say / I Say.”

Don’t forget to post a thoughtful, detailed question set up with a brief summary and a quote from the text (to give the question context) on one of the readings by midnight Tuesday and respond to at least two other students’ questions.

January 29th, Wednesday

“Ch. 3: ‘As He Himself Puts It’: The Art of Quoting”: Main points

MLA: In-text citations

The right word: Activity to develop writing skills

Reading: Reread and add underlining and annotations to “Community Colleges are Bulging, But–” by Charlotte Allen and “Community College Dropout Rate Alarms Researchers” by Nanette Asimov. Add at least two responses, using quotes in quotation sandwiches and citations to reading forum discussions.

Reading: Underline and annotate Ch. 4: “‘Yes / No / Okay, But-’: Three Ways to Respond” (55-67). No question or responses needed.

January 31st, Friday

Lunar New Year

No classes!

5th week: Succeeding in College

February 3rd, Monday

Clustergraph: Keys to academic success

Three Ways to Respond: Main points

Presentations and discussion on “Community Colleges are Bulging, But–” and “Community College Dropout Rate Alarms Researchers”

Clustergraph: One full page of 20-30 bubbles filled with keys to academic success.

Research: Make a list of college resources.

Reading: Underline and annotate Ch. 11: “‘I Take Your Point’: Entering Class Discussion” (141-144) and “‘What’s Motivating This Writer?’: Reading for the Conversation” (144-155) from “They Say / I Say.” Don’t forget to post a thoughtful, detailed question set up with a brief summary, a quote from the text, and a citation on one of the readings by midnight Sunday and respond to at least two other students’ questions.

February 5th, Wednesday

Freewriting: “Staying in College”

College resources / Research groups: Select one resource to research

“‘I Take Your Point’: Entering Class Discussion” and “‘What’s Motivating This Writer?’: Reading for the Conversation: Main points

Freewriting: “Staying in College” (two to three handwritten pages)

Research: One college resource: Location, hours, services, and effectiveness for informal group presentation.

February 7th, Friday

Presentations on college resources

Reading: Underline and annotate Introduction, “Dreaming Big,” “Home,” and “Ma” (1-58) from The Pact. Post a question with a brief summary, quotation and citation to give your question context and at least two responses.

6th week: The Main Idea

February 10th, Monday

Presentations on college resources, cont.

Group discussions on The Pact

Reading: Underline and annotate “Common Ground,” “Caged,” “A Big Break,” and “Hope” (59-105) from The Pact. Post a question with a brief summary, quotation and citation to give your question context and at least two responses.

February 12th, Wednesday

The unified thesis statement

Presentation and discussion on George

Writing: Come up with a working thesis for the “Staying in College” paper, giving specific advice to a specific group. Your thesis should answer the question “Who should do What?”

Reading: Underline and annotate “George on Peer Pressure,” “Summer Odyssey,” “Earth Angel,” and “A Different World” (107-145) from The Pact. Post a question with a brief summary, quotation and citation to give your question context and at least two responses.

February 14th, Friday

Lincoln’s Birthday Observance

(Also Valentine’s Day)

No classes!

February 17th, Monday

Washington’s Birthday Observance

No classes!

7th week: The Paragraph

February 19th, Wednesday

The introduction: Hook, introduction of source material, and thesis

Presentation and discussion on Sam

Writing: Worksheet and introduction to the “Staying in College” paper. Bring in a hard copy.

Reading: Underline and annotate “Rameck on Giving Back,” “Rap,” “Lovesick,” and “Access Med” (147-182) from The Pact. Post a question with a brief summary, quotation and citation to give your question context and at least two responses

February 21st, Friday

Replacing vague words with concrete nouns: you, we, it, that, this, stuff, things, etc.

Presentation and discussion on Rameck

Writing: Rewrite introduction replacing vague words with specific ones. Make other improvements. Bring in hard copy with previous draft and worksheet to turn in for feedback.

Reading: Underline and annotate “Old Ties,”  “D.W.B.,” “Becoming Doctors” and “Sam on Perseverance” (183-224) from The Pact. Post a question with a brief summary, quotation and citation to give your question context and at least two responses.

8th week: The Core of the Sentence

February 24th, Monday

The paragraph: Topic sentences, support and concluding sentences

Group discussion on The Pact

Writing: Worksheet for the body paragraphs for the first paper 1st paper.

Reading: Underline and annotate “Graduation,” “Goodbye” “Home Again,” and Epilogue (225-254) from The Pact. Post a question with a brief summary, quotation and citation to give your question context and at least two responses.

February 26th, Wednesday

Group and open class discussions on The Pact

Writing: Two to four body paragraphs, containing at least three quotes in quotation sandwiches with citations. Bring in a hard copy.

February 28th, Friday

The core of the sentence: Identifying subjects and verbs / Subject-verb agreement

Exercise: Identifying subjects and verbs / Subject-verb agreement

Writing: Underline subjects once and verbs twice in every sentence of body paragraphs. Check and fix subject-verb agreement and make other improvements. Bring in clean hard copy of revised body paragraphs with the underlined previous draft and worksheet to turn in.

9th week: Focus, Focus, Focus

March 3rd, Monday

Strengthening the backbone: Sentence focus

Questionnaire: Checking knowledge of resources and policies

Exercises: Sentence focus

March 5th, Wednesday

Course resources and policies

Sentence focus and active verbs

Writing: 1st complete draft of “Staying In College” paper with strong sentence focus and active verbs. The introduction and body paragraphs must be significantly improved over previous drafts. Bring in two copies for peer review. (Double-sided and recycled paper are okay.)

March 7th, Friday

Checklist for 1st paper: Review of hooks, introduction to source material, thesis, topic sentences, support, and concluding sentences

Peer review

Writing: Totally rewrite “Staying in College” paper according to checklist and feedback from peer review, paying special attention to sentence focus and active verbs. Bring in hard copy along with prewritings, worksheets, previous marked draft of introduction, previous marked draft of body paragraphs, feedback from colleagues, checklist and lab report in a folder. Post your paper on the writing forum on Insight. Read your colleague’s papers to gain their insights and improve your participation score.

Unit II: Finding Your Hidden Intellectualism

10th week: Street Smarts

March 10th, Monday

Concision / Simplifying phrasing

Strategies for taking a timed essay test

Writing: Prepare for midterm exam

March 12th, Wednesday

3rd paper: Midterm in-class essay

Reading: Underline and annotate “Hidden Intellectualism” by Gerald Graff (198-205) from “They Say / I Say,”  “Why Sports Matter” by Wilfrid Sheed (handout), and Ch. 5: ‘And Yet’: Distinguishing What You Say From What They Say” (68-75) from “They Say / I Say.” Post a question on one of the readings and at least two responses.

End of Midterm Period

March 14th, Friday

Writing assignment: “Finding Your Hidden Intellectualism”

Presentations and discussion on “Hidden Intellectualism” and “Why Sports Matter”

Reading: Underline and annotate “In Defense of Cheering” by Jennie Yabroff (thedailybeast.com), “In Defense of Comic Books” by Jim Dixson (examiner.com), and Ch. 9: “‘Ain’t So / Is Not’: Academic Writing Doesn’t Always Mean Setting Aside Your Voice” (121-128) from “They Say / I Say.” Post a question on one of the readings and at least two responses.

11th week: Tying It All Together

March 17th, Monday

Voice

Presentations and discussion on “In Defense of Cheering” and “In Defense of Comic Books”

Reading: Underline and annotate “From Everything Bad is Good for You: How Today’s Popular Culture is Actually Making Us Smarter” by Steven Johnson and “The Couch Potato Path to a Higher IQ” by Walter Kirn (both readings can be found on google). Post a question on one of the readings and at least two responses.

March 19th, Wednesday

Worksheet for the “Hidden Intellectualism” paper

Presentations and discussion on “From Everything Bad is Good for You” and “The Couch Potato Path to a Higher IQ”

Writing: Required revision of “Staying in College” paper, due Friday, March 28th. New score will replace old score. Revision must have substantial changes to organization, argumentation, support, and wording. Quality of revision will also be graded for 500 points.

Writing: 6-8 pages of prewriting (brainstorming, freewriting, clustergraph, list, chart, outline, or journalistic questions) and worksheet for the “Hidden Intellectualism” paper

March 21st, Friday

Connecting words: Coordination, subordination, and transitions

Writing: Introduction and one body paragraph of “Hidden Intellectualism” paper with a variety of connecting words, showing logical relationships. Bring in a hard copy to turn in for feedback.

Reading: Ch. 8: ‘As a Result’: Connecting the Parts” (105-120). No question or responses necessary.

12th week: Audience and Purpose

March 24th, Monday

Connecting the parts of a paper

Writing: Complete draft of 2nd paper with a variety of connecting words and approaches to connecting the parts of the essay. Bring in a hard copy.

Reading: Underline and annotate Ch. 7: ‘So What? Who Cares?’: Saying Why It Matters” (92-100) from “They Say / I Say.” No question or responses necessary.

March 6th, Wednesday

Checklist for “Hidden Intellectualism” paper

“So What and Who Cares?”: Main points

Sentence boundaries

Writing: Revise paper according to checklist. Check the paper carefully for sentence boundaries and punctuation. Bring in a hard copy.

Reading: Underline and annotate Ch. 6: ‘Skeptics May Object’: Planting a Naysayer in Your Text” (78-90) from “They Say / I Say.” No question or responses necessary.

March 28th, Friday

Naysayers

Sentence boundaries, cont.

Writing: Check paper for sentence boundaries, connecting words, and punctuation. Add at least two naysayer comments to your paper. Make other improvements. Bring in 2 copies for peer review. (Double-sided and recycled paper are okay.)

Reading: Underline and annotate Ch. 10: ‘But Don’t Get Me Wrong’: The Art of Metacommentary” (129-137) from “They Say / I Say.” No question or responses necessary.

March 31st, Monday

Cesar Chavez Day

No classes!

April 1st-7th

Spring Break

No classes!

Unit III: Issues of Language and Identity

13th week: Our Englishes

April 9th, Wednesday

Metacommentary

Peer review

Writing: Polished draft of the 2nd paper, which must be significantly different than previous drafts. Add at least two metacommentaries to your paper. Bring in with prewriting, worksheets, drafts, checklist, and lab report in a folder. Post on Insight and read your colleagues’ papers.

April 11th, Friday

Parallelism

Reading: Underline and annotate “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan and “Mute in an English-Only World” by Chang-Rae Lee (both readings can be found on google or Insight). Post a question on one of the readings and at least two responses.

Exercise: Parallelism

14th week: Different Ways of Talking

April 14th, Monday

Writing assignment: “Issues of Language and Identity”

Presentations and discussions on “Mother Tongue” and “Mute in an English-Only World”

Reading: Underline and annotate and “Why and When We Speak Spanish in Public” by Myriam Marquez, “Always Living in Spanish,” by Marjorie Agosín, and “Like Mexicans” by Gary Soto. (All readings may be found on Google or Insight.) Post a question and at least two responses.

April 16th, Wednesday

Presentations and discussions on “Why and When We Speak Spanish in Public,” “Always Living in Spanish,” and “Like Mexicans”

Reading: Underline and annotate “Gender in the Classroom” by Deborah Tannen.

Research: Find, underline, and annotate an article from the library or library databases that is related to your chosen topic for the “Issues of Language and Identity” paper. Bring in to class to share your research.

April 18th, Friday

Brainstorm issues of language and identity

Presentation and discussion: “Gender in the Classroom”

Sharing research: Student presentations and group discussion

Writing: 6-8 pages of prewriting and worksheet for the “Issues of Language and Identity” paper.

Research: Find, underline, and annotate an article from the library or library databases that is related to your chosen topic for the “Issues of Language and Identity” paper. Bring in to class to share your research.

15th week: Adding detail

April 21st, Monday

Finding and evaluating sources

Sharing research: Student presentations and group discussion

Writing: Introduction and first body paragraph of “Issues of Language and Identity” paper. Bring in a hard copy for feedback.

Research: Find, underline, and annotate an article from the library or library databases that is related to your chosen topic for the “Issues of Language and Identity” paper. Bring in to class to share your research.

April 23rd, Wednesday

Sharing research: Student presentations and group discussion

Adding detail to nouns

Exercises: Adjective clauses and phrases

April 25th, Friday

Flex Day for Teachers

No classes!

16th week: Review

April 28th, Monday

Adjective clauses and phrases

Writing: Complete draft of “Issues of Language and Identity paper” with a variety of adjective clauses and phrases (at least ten).

Review: Vocabulary, grammar of the sentence, and “They Say / I Say” for game show style review.

(Bring in “They Say / I Say”)

April 30th, Wednesday

Game Show Style Review:  Vocabulary, grammar of the sentence, and “They Say / I Say”

Writing: Work on “Issues of Language and Identity” paper.

Review: Vocabulary, grammar of the sentence, and “They Say / I Say” for the quiz

(Bring in “They Say / I Say”)

May 2nd, Friday

Checklist for “Issues of Language and Identity” paper

Quiz on vocabulary, grammar of the sentence and “They Say / I Say”

Writing: Revise “Issues of Language and Identity” paper according to checklist. Must be significantly improved over 1st draft or I won’t read it.

17th week: Authentic Tasks

May 5th, Monday

Persuasive letters and reviews

Go over quiz / teacher-led workshop on “Issues of Language and Identity” paper

Writing: Revise paper according to workshop. Bring in three copies of “Issues of Language and Identity” paper for peer review. (Double-sided and recycled paper are okay.)

Writing: Letter to a politician, administrator or other official (one detailed page of two or three paragraphs). Bring in three copies for peer review

May 7th, Wednesday

Peer review

Writing: Revise paper and letter according to feedback. Make other improvements

.

May 9th, Friday

Peer review

Writing: “Issues of Language and Identity” paper polished draft, due Monday, May 12th. Bring in a hard copy with previous drafts, worksheet, checklist, and lab report in a folder.

Writing: Letter to a politician, administrator or other official, letter to editor, or review of The Pact. Send the letter and bring in a hard copy and proof that you have sent it by Monday, May 12th.

18th week: Wrapping It UP

May 12th, Monday

In-Class Writing Practice

Writing: Prepare for final in-class essay

May 14th, Wednesday

Final In-Class Essay

Word!

1 thought on “Syllabus for English 93: Developmental Composition Class”

  1. Thank you again for posting your syllabus ideas for Developmental Composition. You have helped me SO MUCH both in contemplating ideas and in helping me wade through preparing for my initial go at teaching these courses. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

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